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THE HUMAN AND ITS OTHERS: SOCIETY
Syllabus, teaching tools, resources for students

Detail of A Sybil by Domenichino (1616-17) www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/d/domenich/sibyl.html

"Faust" (?) or alchemist scholar... by Rembrandt (1562, Rijksmuseum, Holland).

WINTER 2012: SOCIETY Understood through Literature and Rhetoric, History and Law

Vivian Folkenflik
Office: HIB 197 (in HCC office; enter student door near Artsbridge)
Office hours Monday 1:30-3, Thursday 12-1, and by appointment

E-Mail: vrfolken@uci.edu

Note: T/Th 9:30 lectures are in Bio Sci 3. Note your discussion time below!

Humanities Honors Discussion HC4 29095 meets Tu/Th 2-3:20 in HH 214. The class listserv email for this class is 29095-W12@classes.uci.edu. The final exam for this class is Thursday, March 22, 1:30-3:30 in HH 214.

Humanities Discussion B11 29053 meets Tu/Th 3:30-4:50 in HH 224. The class listserv email for this class is 29053-W12@classes.uci.edu . The final exam for this class is Tuesday, March 20, 4-6 pm in HH 224.

We will have some TBA classes in the computer lab HH269A (follow the corridor room #s to 269, and then look for room A inside that 269 door, or ask the person at the desk).

Class website http://vivian-folkenflik.org/core-course-winter%2012.htm

Course website https://eee.uci.edu/programs/humcore/Student/Winter2012/index.html

 

Schedule is Subject to Change! Check the week-by-week schedule below. Come prepared to lecture and section: do the reading in advance.

Week 1

Tuesday January 10

First Day Writing: In-class diagnostic: Understanding the World through Literature, Understanding Literature through the World?

Lecture 1. The Spiritual and the Worldly in the Faust Legend

Reading: Johann von Goethe's Faust I, lines 1-2336

  • Goethe in the Campagna, 1787, by J.H.W. Tischbein (oil painting, Städel Museum, Frankfurt, Germany)
  • TWO IMAGES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN HUMAN BEINGS AND SOCIETY
  • Liberty Guiding the People, Eugène Delacroix (Oil on canvas, 1830), Musée du Louvre, Paris, France. Delacroix's painting, one form of Social Romanticism, represents Liberty (a concept? a goddess?) as leading bourgeois and working men to join together in hope of a society closer to the social and individual ideals of 1776 (American Revolution), 1789, and 1830 (French Revolutions) that shocked and inspired Goethe's Europe. Would you say that this iconic representation of "Liberty" prompted social change, or that that real-life changes in society shaped this work of art?

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog (Nebelmeer: Fog-Sea), by the Romantic painter Caspar David Friedrich (1818), oil painting, Kunsthalle Museum, Hamburg, Germany. The Romantic hero is often represented as a single, lone figure in the world (with or without a "romantic" love life) after the social revolutions of the 18th-19thc. Social change inspiring art? Or art inspiring life?

Thursday Lecture 2. The Inner-Worldly Spirituality of the Faust Legend.

https://eee.uci.edu/programs/humcore/Student/Winter2012/index.html

  • Reading:  Johann von Goethe's Faust I, lines 2337-4614
  • Writer’s Handbook: Analyzing Drama

Reading:  Johann von Goethe's Faust I, lines 2337-4614

SCENES TO PLAY?

Night: Faust and the town 79-83

Faust and Wagner 73-85

Night: Faust and the Earth Spirit 37-

Faust's Study: Faust meets the Poodle Mephisto 104-5

Study: Faust and Mephisto make the Wager 131

Study: Mephisto [in Faust's scholar's gown] and the poor Student 143-

Auerbach's Cellar: the drinking party

  • Writing: Writer’s Handbook: Analyzing Drama (Walsh);
  • Pre-Writing Grid #4

 

 

Week Two

Monday, 1/16 is a holiday, so there's no lecture Tuesday 1/17. But we have class Tuesday!!

ESSAY 4: Working with a secondary source interpretation of Faust: Essay I asks you to consider a critic's reading of Faust as a positive or negative figure as presented by the evidence in "Dungeon," the final scene of Faust I . For example, the scholar quoted in your prompt, Albert Destro

1] emphasizes the moral importance of an individual's relationship to his or her society as a foundation of ethics

2] assumes that a creative writer may create a protagonist whose views and goals are different from his own beliefs or aims

3] asserts that "in Goethe’s eyes, Faust’s character is, from an ordinary moral point of view, highly problematic, and"

4] concludes that "the road critics have taken in the pursuit of his positive moral substance in reality leads nowhere."

 

 https://eee.uci.edu/programs/humcore/Student/Winter2012/Images-PW/Destro.pdf

 

You may agree with another scholar, disagree, or agree in part (a yes/but thesis). But note: Although a yes/but thesis acknowledges complexity, it nevertheless stakes out a clear major position. Before you can decide what you think about a critic's reading, make sure you re-read your primary and secondary texts.

ESSAY 4: USING A SECONDARY SOURCE:

In this essay, you will respond to Destro’s argument in order to argue that Faust is either a positive or negative figure. The evidence for your arguments should come primarily from the final scene of Faust I, “Dungeon.” You must decide whether Faust’s words and actions indeed demonstrate an “immoral ‘morality’” or whether his focus on individual self-realization presents a positive alternative to the town's community values and punishments.

 

A successful essay will make a clear statement of whether Faust is a positive or negative figure and an argument that explains why; include specific examples and/or quotes from the text of the play to support your arguments; include a total of four secondary sources in your bibliography relating to your topic (two of these are your edition of Faust and the Destro article) ; and engage with one secondary source (the Destro passage above) in a way that makes clear your own reaction to the secondary source’s argument. Your essay should be roughly 5-6 pages and will count for 30% of your writing grade.

 

 

 

TWO IMAGES OF GRETCHEN

The meeting of Faust and Gretchen, by J. Tissot (oil painting, Musee d'Orsay, Paris).

  • Gretchen (Margaret) discovering Faust's jewels, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti (chalk, Tullie House , UK).

Writing: Writer's Handbook: Working with Secondary Sources (Mitchell)

Reading: Johann von Goethe's Faust I (re-read)

  • Writing: In-class work on Faust thesis

The problem: What's the difference between a speech and a deed?

 

Kinds of Speech

Example
Descriptive I feel I love you, "I burn,""Do I not at every moment feel her woe?" etc.
Prescriptive I should love you or should marry you; I ought to...
Contractual speech-act

Specific form of speech that is itself an action/deed:
I do [marry] you, I engage myself to you (Faust never says), as contractual promise [rather than prediction of lasting feelings].

Other examples:
I free you (to a slave),
I will and bequeath (if I sign the will),
[Perhaps the speech pronouncing Gretchen "She is saved!" at the end of Dungeon, if it's really from Heaven ]

Speech-act From the Declaration of Independence:

We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress, assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the name, and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies are, and of right ought to be free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as free and independent states, they have full power to levey war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do [...]

 

 

Week Three

TUESDAY JAN 24: Last Lecture on FAUST!

Mephistopheles flying over Wittenberg, by Eugene Delacroix (lithograph)

Writing: Working Draft #4 Workshop

Thursday January 26:

Reading Kleist: "The Betrothal in Santo Domingo"

 

 Kleist Reading/Discussion Questions:
1.        What is the perspective of the narrator in the first paragraph in the
story?  Does the narrator betray a prejudice/bias? Towards whom? How so?


2.        How does race function in the story?  List all the ways you can think
of that race is important to the story.



3.        What causes Toni’s change of loyalties?

4.        Is Toni comparable to Gretchen? How?

5.        Are there any elements in the story that contradict the narrator’s
perspective? What are they? Are we supposed to trust this narrator?

6.        Who is left standing at the end of the story? Who do you think “wins”
here? Do the survivors prosper? Does anyone come out ahead or better at
the end of the story than they were at the beginning? Who and why?

7.        What questions do you think the story raises (beyond the plot)?

8.        Look for the key conflict in the text. How would you describe what this
is? Race? Family? Marriage? 

9.     What do you think the conclusion of the story means?

10.        Did your (or your neighbor/friend/roommate’s) reading of the society
presented in this story make you change your own view of it?
                

 

Toussaint L'Ouverture, leader of slave rebellion in Santo Domingo

    • Reading: Heinrich von Kleist's "The Betrothal in Santo Domingo"
 

 

WEEK FOUR

TUESDAY: Continue Kleist: "The Betrothal in Santo Domingo."

ESSAY 4 DUE.

ESSAY 4 DUE IN HARD COPY IN CLASS, in a folder with all work (all drafts, pre-writing, comments from me or from peer).

 

 

THURSDAY:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumbull%27s_Declaration_of_Independence Declaration of Independence, by John Trumbull (oil painting, 1817-19, United States Capitol Rotunda, Washington, D.C.)

Declaration of Independence (1776) (HCC Reader)

 

 

 

Week Five

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 7:

http://specialcollections.vassar.edu/exhibit-highlights/my_dearest_friend/index.html

Portrait of Abigail Adams, and Portrait of John Adams
Collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society (vassar.edu)

  • Reading: "Remember the Ladies" (letters from Abigail Adams to John Adams concerning the consideration of women in the formation of the new republic, 1771-76) (in HCC Reader); Toussaint L'Ouverture's Constitution, Saint-Domingue, 1801 (in HCC Reader).
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toussaint_LouvertureFrançois-Dominique Toussaint L'Ouverture
  • For the "Declarations in Dialogue " unit, note below the documents you will need to know for the exam on Thursday.

  • Lab work E-L-P Messageboard on the Declaration.
  • Groupwork Documents exercise: each group will examine one document with the goal of preparing for the essay questions. Each group should note:

    1. the “ethos” of the document
    2. the thesis or key points in lecture about the document
    3. the historical context (scene, culture, time period, situtaion) of the document
    4. its importance in its own time
    5. meaning for our time

    Important documents include:

    1. The Declaration of Independence
    2. The letters of Abigail Adams to her husband
    3. Letter of Abigail Adams to her friend Isaac Smith
    4. Letter of Abigail Adams to her friend Mercy Warren
    5. John Adams’ letter to his friend James Sullivan
    6. The Haitian Constitution

THURSDAY: FEBRUARY 9 LECTURE AND MIDTERM EXAM Bring a large bluebook and two pens or pencils to our regular classroom at our usual time.

LECTURE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seneca_Falls_ConventionElizabeth Cady Stanton in 1848 with two of her sons

  • Selections from Elizabeth Cady Stanton, et al, The History of Woman Suffrage with emphasis on the "Declaration of Sentiments" (July 19-20, 1948) from the Seneca Fall Convention on the rights of women (in HCC Reader)
MIDTERM EXAM in SECTION, in our regular classroom. Bring an exam bluebook. The exam will consist of 6 out of 8 short answers and 1 out of 2 essay questions.
  • Short answers: will include one question from class oral presentations, an image from this class page or lecture , and one or more Study Questions from Weeks 1-5.
 

Buster Brown Valentine, postcard by Richard Felton Outcault, early 20th century (Wikimedia)

Week Six

http://starrcenter.washcoll.edu/student_opportunities/student_fellowships_douglass.php What do you consider the most important "topos" or point of interest to start thinking about Douglass's self-presentation in the Narrative? Your essay prompt calls ethos "a self-presentation appropriate for the situation in which the author is addressing the readers, the selection and staging of the experiences, thoughts, and feelings of the autobiographical "subject" to achieve particular effects." Your assignment asks: "How does Douglass craft an ethos in his 1845 Narrative? What rhetorical choices has he made, and why?"

  • Reading for this unit: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, and his speech "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" For the Narrative, read A Note about the Text, the Preface, the Narrative, and the Appendix (pp. 31-125). The speech "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" is in the same volume (pp. 146-171).
  • Writing: DOUGLASS PRE-WRITING GRIDS FOR ONE OF YOUR PASSAGES - bring to class ! Use a portion of the speech that interests you. These grids 5A and 5B are due in class, in hard copy. You may use the Word or Writable PDF form on the HCC menu Pre-writing. 5A is the classical way to establish the ethos or authority of the speaker [here, Douglass as autobiographer], and 5B is there in case it encourages you to reach out to the way Douglass includes his use of logos and pathos in that self-representation.
  • HCC 1B: Winter 2012 Pre-writing Grid #5a    Rhetorical Analysis in Frederick Douglass’s Narrative: Ethos                              V. Folkenflik

    Assignment:  Rhetoric is the study of the means of persuasion. You have been asked to analyze the way Douglass crafted an ethos in his Narrative: a self-presentation appropriate for his situation, involving the selection and staging of his experiences, thoughts, and feelings as an autobiographical subject in order to achieve particular effects in his readership.   Prof. Jarratt has suggested some interpretive “topoi” or topics, places to start your thinking.   Will you see Douglass as an exceptional man – or as a representative man? Will you see him as a learner, or as a teacher, or both? Use your prompt and class discussion to consider “topoi” that direct you to find key passages.   This grid is intended to start you working on analysis of ethos in one of your key passages.

     

     

    Locate a passage and try to describe self-presentation in your own words. Give page#.

    Find a keyword or phrase that relates to one of the “topoi” or “topics” you find on the prompt, discussion, or reading

    Why is this keyword or   phrase interesting in relation to Douglass’s ethos, as you see it here?  

    How does this keyword relate to your analysis of the ethos of self-presentation in the Narrative as a whole?

    SO WHAT? Why might Douglass have made these particular rhetorical choices?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Quote exactly. Give line#

    Appeal to civic values?    American or international documents? Natural rights?

    In the passage you have chosen here, is Douglass speaking about himself as he is now, in the present, or remembering himself in a different time and place? Where does he speak differently?

     

     

  • HCC 1B: Winter 2012 Pre-writing Grid #5b                              V. Folkenflik

    Assignment:  Rhetoric is the study of the means of persuasion. You have been asked to analyze the way Douglass crafted an ethos in his Narrative: a self-presentation appropriate for his situation, involving the selection and staging of his experiences, thoughts, and feelings as an autobiographical subject in order to achieve particular effects in his readership.   Prof. Jarratt has suggested some interpretive “topoi” or topics, places to start your thinking.   Will you see Douglass as an exceptional man – or as a representative man? Will you see him as a learner, or as a teacher, or both? Use your prompt and class discussion to consider “topoi” that direct you to find key passages.   This grid is intended to help you continue working on analysis of one of your key passages by including appeals to logos and pathos in your discussion of Douglass’s choices about self-presentation.

     

     

    Locate a passage and try to describe its self-presentation in your own words. Give page#.

    Find a keyword or phrase that relates to one of the “topoi” or “topics” you find on the prompt, discussion, or reading

    Why is an appeal to Logos or Pathos  interesting in relation to Douglass’s ethos, presentation of himself here ?  

    How does this keyword relate to your analysis of the ethos of self-presentation in the Narrative as a whole?

    SO WHAT? Why might Douglass have made these particular rhetorical choices in presenting himself?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Quote exactly. Give line#

    Acknowledging which emotions of characters? Appealing to which emotions in readers? Use of logic, facts, knowledge?

    In the passage you have chosen here, is Douglass speaking about himself as he is now, in the present, or remembering himself in a different time and place? Where does he speak differently?

     

     

     

     

     

  • NOTE: Remember that I have done a Handbook chapter #2 on the Douglass speech you will be reading next week! Access it on the Core Course menu or at https://eee.uci.edu/programs/humcore/Student/WritersHandbook/Ch2_ActiveReadingTextualAnalysis_Folkenflik.html

NINETEENTH-CENTURY REPRESENTATIONS OF SLAVE LIFE:

Slave market, by Eyre Crowe (oil painting, 1853). What do you see? Visual analysis? Rhetoric?

Slave market (artist unknown?) What does the artist choose to show? Where is the point of view? What's the message?

Optional: For an edgy take by conceptual artist Fred Wilson, try to find a site for his controversial "Mining the Museum," or see the review of a more recent one at the New York Historical Society, "Liberty/Liberté." What challenges is he trying to present to viewers? The controversy is described in a Huffington Post review.

For more on Fourth of July celebrations, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Day_%28United_States%29

 

Thursday: Continued work on Douglass essay.

 

 

Fri, Feb 17, 11:00-11:50 a.m, BS3 Lecture Hall: Special Forum with Prof. Robert S. Levine: "The Lives of Frederick Douglass"

 

Tuesday Week 7: Class WILL be held in lab. Discussion of #5 drafts. (No lecture because of President's Day holiday!)

This representation of a slave was made in 1787 for the English pottery firm Wedgwood and was reproduced in many different formats. Josiah Wedgwood, a Quaker, was a member of the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade, and his firm designed this seal for their campaign. How would you compare and contrast the image to Douglass's own self-presentation in his 1845 Narrative or the 1852 speech "What to the slave is the Fourth of July?" Prof. Jarratt: FD sometimes puts himself in the position of someone asking this question, sometimes in the position of someone answering this question.

Prof. Jarratt's "thesis" in lecture on David W. Blight's intro: "Blight's emphasis on the 'story,' along with his frequent references to 'propaganda' [7, 10, 14, 20, 22] and 'manipulation' [10, 13], diminish the force of Douglass's Narrative as a rhetorical contribution to the abolitionist movement."

Status structures that might be familiar stories: Low status to high, child to adult, slave to free...??

Argument Douglass wants to make about slavery? Whom does it damage, how, and why? What action should the reading public take?

Choices about when to appeal to the reader's emotions, and how?

 

 

DEVELOPING A THESIS FROM AN IDEAS DRAFT

  1. For students working on Douglass as "storyteller": what does this mean to you? What kind of storyteller? Grimm's Fairy Tales? Toni Morrison? Epictetus might see Douglass presenting himself as interpreter: "But god has introduced man into the world as a spectator of himself and his works; and not only as a spectator, but an interpreter of them" (7) . Is Douglass not only telling but interpreting what he sees, and perhaps asking his readers to interpret what they see? Do you see young Frederick interpreting what happens to him? Or Douglass, as narrator, interpreting what happened to young Frederick?
  2. For students working on Douglass presenting himself as exceptional and/or representative, Rabbi Hillel might ask Douglass his famous three questions: 1] If I am not for myself, who will be for me? 2] If I am only for myself, what am I? 3] If not now, when? (135). How is Douglass presenting himself in response to this ancient challenge? Which are the key passages for Douglass in terms of "myself"/for others?
  3. For students interested in Douglass presenting himself as a religious writer: If you see Douglass presenting himself primarily in these terms, why do you see your key passages as central to him as narrator? How and where is it so important for him to define himself this way? Where could his allusions, quotations, style, or rhetorical turns show you that?
  4. For students interested in seeing Douglass presenting himself as intellectual, educated, teacher, or Enlightenment narrator of his own story: which key passages would you analyze in order to persuade your own reader? Consider not only the plot but also his style, vocab, quotations or allusions, use of rhetorical terms?
  5. For students interested in seeing Douglas presenting himself as a calm, objective American arguing for the good of the country as a whole, rather than as an angry ex-slave speaking up for his own "race," which key passages would you use for that? Where could his allusions, quotations, or reasoning patterns show you him that way?
  6. For students working on the "animal" topos: Where does Douglass's self-presentation show you that he is not an animal, using the passages that most interest you where he talks about slaves being treated this way? How does his rhetoric persuade the reader to interpret the situations he has seen, and describes in your passages?
  7. Useful Website: Silva Rhetoricae (The Forest of Rhetoric): http://rhetoric.byu.edu/ with pages on "persuasive appeals,"ethos, logos, pathos," and click-list of a whole "forest" of rhetorical terms. From the page on ethos: "Ethos names the persuasive appeal of one's character, especially how this character is established by means of the speech or discourse."

 

 

Thursday Week 7: Lecture on Douglass's 1852 speech: "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" For more on Fourth of July celebrations, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Day_%28United_States%29

WORKING DRAFT #5 WILL BE DUE 2/23 Thursday in class Week 7 IN DROPBOX AND TURNITIN. (There will be a special Turnitin entry for Working Draft #5, as well as a separate one for the Final Draft.)

NOTE FOR PLANNING: Final drafts will be due 2/27 Tuesday OF Week 8 IN hard copy, DROPBOX AND TURNITIN. All drafts, pre-writing, notes from TWC, peer comments, and HARD COPY of final draft must be submitted in your folder Tuesday of Week 8 in class.

 

This is one of many photographs of lynchings, some sent as postcards. This is probably a lynching of an African-American, but Kingston also notes lynchings of people of Chinese ancestry. This one is in a public place; there seems to be at least one girl or woman present. More images and information on http://withoutsanctuary.org/main.html

The "Contemplation of Justice," a statue on the steps of the United States Supreme Court Building. To find out more about this statue, its representation of Justice, and its companion "Authority," go to http://www.supremecourt.gov/about/FraserStatuesInfoSheet.pdf

WEEK 8: The Legal Cases: Plessy v. Ferguson.

http://www.supremecourt.gov/

Some historical landmarks from Douglass, Plessy, Brown, Mendez :

Frederick Douglass 1852: "What to the Slave...?" - a fellow-citizen?

Dred Scott 1857: Af-Ams cannot be citizens (Taney, 15)

13th Amendment 1865 (11) - abolishes slavery & involuntary servitude

Civil Rights Act of 1866 (13) - defines born citizens; contracts, security, etc.

14th Amendment 1868, to make sure CRA-1866 is constitutional, 4 parts

15th Amendment 1870 - vote not abridged by race, color, previous servitude

Civil Rights Act of 1875 (23): all people equal hotels, transport, theater...

Civil Rights Cases:SCt declares CRA-1875 unconst. 1883 (23-24) (social, individual)

George W. Cable: The Freedman's Case in Equity, 1885

Henry W. Grady: In Plain Black and White

Louisiana law 1890 mandates separate but equal, to fit 14th Am

Tourgee and Plessy initiate arrest for Plessy v. Ferguson 1892

Booker T. Washington Atlanta Exposition Address 1895

Supreme Ct verdict 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson. Majority and dissent.

W. E. B. Du Bois: Strivings of the Negro People, 1897

Segregationist "Jim Crow" laws: "The term itself had its origins in the 1830s, beginning with the minstrel show of Thomas "Daddy" Rice, a white man who blackened his face with burnt cork, dressed in rags, and danced and sang in a caricature of blacks. He called this part of his show "Jump Jim Crow," after a crippled black slave who belonged to a white man named Crow. White audiences loved the demeaning portrayal of a grinning, shuffling black man, and the term quickly entered the language. During the 1840s, abolitionist newspapers adopted the term to describe the segregated railroad cars in northern states." (Irons, Peter, Jim Crow's Children: The Broken Promise of the Brown Decision, Penguin Books, 2004, p. 12)

Background to interstate commerce laws can be found on

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/highwayhistory/road/s04.cfm

Mendez v. Westminster (Week Nine)

Brown v. Bd of Ed (Week Nine)

[References to African-Americans in China Men?]

 

For Counterargument #6: 
 Bring a printout of the prompt, your Plessy and your pre-writing grid, which will be
essential for this next assignment.  The passage you are counterarguing
will be Harlan's "There is a race so different from our own..." passage;
it starts on 58, fourteen lines from the bottom.  You may take it to the
next page up until "any legal grounds";  NOTE For counterarguing: you may
agree with some parts of Harlan's reasoning, yet disagree with other
parts. 
 Tips: I strongly recommend that you number the lines before class, and that at home you start listing premises and
conclusions.  Appropriate Handbook chapters are listed on my grid, and I have emailed you a link to the"Logical Fallacies" powerpoint contributed by
instructor Aaron Griffith.  Consider your "Fallacies" list, but don't limit yourself to that list. 
Tip: Consider also the interesting case of the nine-year-old daughter of Gong Lum, which Prof. Thomas will discuss next week.
NOTE: I will not be collecting drafts for this assignment, but you will be required to bring an outline to class next Tuesday with the major points you will make and the evidence you will use. Remember that Prof. Thomas will be giving a Q and A after lecture Thurs. Stay and ask your questions!

Six Strategies for Counterargument

  1. Critique the assumptions behind a writer’s premises by exposing unfair assumptions or unstated premises as false.
  2. Assess the truthfulness of the premises themselves.
  3. Examine the strength or relevance of the evidence used to support the argument.
  4. Interrogate the logic of the argument itself and expose any fallacies.
  5. Stun your readers by proposing a superior alternative argument of your own using the same set of evidence.
  6. Supply additional evidence that supports an alternative conclusion that the original argument did not account for.  You may write as yourself in 2012.

High school student Kiri Davis recreates Dr. Kenneth Clark's experiment (used in Brown v. Bd of Ed). Watch it on A Girl Like Me (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0BxFRu_SOw)

Tuesday: From Plessy to Mendez v. Westminster and Brown v. Bd of Ed

  • Tuesday Reading: Brook Thomas, ed., Plessy v. Ferguson: a Brief History with Documents, pp. 169-176; Brown v. Board of Education (in HCC Reader); Brook Thomas' Mendez v. Westminster (in HCC Reader).
  • Writing: Outline for Essay #6 - BRING HARD COPY TO CLASS
  • Plessy majority
    --logic: formal qualities of separate-but-equal laws
    Harlan dissent
    --true intention of separate-but-equal, what "everybody knows" was intended
    Brown court
    --effect/affect of separate-but-equal law according to new evidence, finding from psych & soc sci in modern times (289) rather than original intentions
  • Bakke court: Affirmative action: quotas declared unconstitutional, but race can be considered as one factor in student application
Is this argument present in... Harlan's dissent ? Brown v. Bd of Ed ?
"Colorblind Constitution"?    
Intent of sep-but-equal?    
13th Amendment an issue?    

https://eee.uci.edu/programs/humcore/Student/WritersHandbook/Ch18_LogicalFallacies_Fogli.html

Logical Fallacies in Handbook

Here's the link to your Handbook chapter 18 on Logical Fallacies!

https://eee.uci.edu/programs/humcore/Student/WritersHandbook/Ch18_LogicalFallacies_Fogli.html

Hasty generalization: In probabilistic or inductive argument, too small a sample: jumping to a generalized conclusion from insufficient necessary evidence
Circular reasoning Conclusion is the same as the premise
Post hoc/propter hoc After something happened, therefore because of it (I lost my car keys, so therefore it rained cats and dogs)...
Equivocation wordplay -- can be great, but isn't a basis for deductive logic!! plays on the improper use of two different meanings for the same term.
Non sequitur General term for a deductive argument where the conclusion does not follow from the premises, or is only a very weak inference. "When I lived at home, I never had to do my own laundry, so I don’t see why I have to do it now.”
Red herring: an irrelevant but attractive distraction (the "red" herring distracts you from the real issue you need to think about)
Straw man setting up an easy target, perhaps by misrepresenting your opponent's opinion, or attacking an irrelevant opponent
Ad hominem attacking the personal character of your opponent instead of his or her reasoning (mean to roommates, so can't be right about global warming)
False analogy: a comparison, simile, metaphor, analogy that looks good, but actually doesn't work in this particular case
either-or fallacy setting up only two choices, when there could actually be a third way to go, or even a fourth or fifth possibility
Slippery slope saying disaster Y will necessarily always happen if you let step X occur
Bandwagon must be true because it's the popular or majority opinion
Appeal to pathos??? CAN be a fallacy, if it's inappropriate... we feel sympathetic for the reasons you stole the car, but we still can't judge you innocent?
Appeal to authority??? CAN be a fallacy, if it's inappropriate... just because I say so?
   
   

 

ESSAY 6 final draft WILL BE DUE IN DROPBOX, SATURDAY 5 PM OF WEEK 10. Turnitin too, of course.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mokolii "Chinaman's Hat," Molkoli'i, Hawaii

For Thursday: start China Men

Maxine Hong Kingston

Student points from lecture:

Tiffany: What is Citizenship? The most important thing Professor T. said in lecture was the mention of Wong Kim Ark vs. the United States (1898). The decision of that case was the base of what allowed many people today to be citizens; that the jurisdiction of citizenship was decided not only by blood, but also by soil (jus soli). If a person was born on US soil, they were thus a US citizen. [Please note that citizenship is also by jus sanguinis, for ex. children of US citizens born abroad. Thanks to Wong Kim Ark, United States recognizes both jus sanguinis and jus soli.

Gianna: What is Americanization? An important theme of Kingston's "China Men" is the "Americanization" of the Chinese men. This process is seen first through the allocation of two different chapters for Kingston's father: "Father from China" and, later, "American Father."

Jenny: Structure of the book: I thought the most interesting point Prof. T. made was about the laws being "central," both physically and figuratively. I knew the laws passed by the US greatly impacted the lives of Kingston's male relatives, but I never made the connection of the chapters being "central" to the book as well.

Chris C: The historical father: I think the most important part was how Kingston couldn't give a clear story as to how her father entered the US. Because he was still alive at the time she wrote the book, he could risk deportation if she gave the actual (and in all likelihood, less than legal) story. Thus she gave two separate stories in order to protect him.

 

 

Reading: Maxine Hong Kingston's China Men. Assignment 1-81, & "The Laws" chapter 158-159.

Telling, silencing, listening, counterarguing? Maxine says to her father: "I want to know [...] why when you do talk, you talk differently from Mother. I take after MaMa. We have peasant minds. We see a stranger's mind and ascribe motives. I'll tell y ou what I suppose from your silences and few words, and you can tell me that I'm mistaken. You'll just have to speak up with the real stories if I've got you wrong" (15). Compare How men tell "stories [of the Gold Mountain], which were not fabulations like the fairy tales and ghost stories told by women" (41).

  • "The Yellow Peril," allegorical painting based on a sketch by Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany: "Völker Europas, wahrt eure heiligsten Güter" ("Peoples of Europe, guard your dearest goods").
 Maxine Hong Kingston and Vivian, looking at her book - she writes in her books, too!
Maxine's Family - partial list Places
Great grandfather Bak Goong Sandalwood Mountains - what's the "shout" ?
Grandfather Ah Goong Sierra Nevada Mountains - built the railroad; in America at the time of the SF fire [>papers]?"in time to be a citizen and to father citizens" (151)...
Grandmother Ah Po Has four sons: Dai Bak, Ngee Bak, Sahm Bak, "Ed"
1.Dai Bak (Maxine's oldest uncle) > SF?
2.Ngee Bak >Chicago?
3.Sahm Bak >Canada?
4.BiBi/BaBa/"Ed" Edison (Eh-Da-Son) Maxine's father, a scholar and teacher born in China. Does he come to the US through NYC??Ed-da-Son?? or...??? SF? During Maxine's childhood in Stockton, runs a laundry? a gambling house? What do we know about his life? Does he prosper, in the end?
Maxine's mother Trained as a doctor in China (67)>NYC around 1938-39?); in Stockton, works in the fields, canneries (See also MHK's book about the women in her family, The Woman Warrior, and myth FaMuLan .) Maxine thinks and asks "like MaMa" in some ways(15).
Maxine's mother's family had 4 girls, 1 boy 268. Are the mother's relatives equally important?
Grandfather Ah Goong's brothers ("3rd Sahm Goong & 4th Say Goong: 3rd and 4th Great-Grandfathers) See "More Americans"
"Mad Sao" "very American," but has left his mother behind, so...?
Kau Goong pirate, criminal...?
Uncle Bun World Communism? wheat germ?
Maxine's Generation Find the page #s, add or give information?
Maxine and her sister, two girls in SF?  
Three brothers?  
Story of youngest brother ?  
Cousin Lucille?  
A black cousin in China?  
A long-dead brother and sister that Maxine never knew?  
   
   
   
   
   

 

Chinese workers Loma Prieta RRChinese workers Central Pacific RR american.eduChinese workers with white foreman

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Transcontinental_Railroad offers some images of the "last spike" and the golden spike on display.

 

TIPS FOR PASSAGE ANALYSIS: You may use these tips as a template, or integrate them into an essay.

  1. Paraphrase the main point of the passage: what's going on here? Identify any characters or cultural figures named in the passage. Call the narrator "Kingston" and her younger self "little Maxine" or "young Maxine" or "Maxine."
  2. Identify at least three important keywords, explain or define ?
  3. Ethos of narrator: What does she know, that makes us trust her authority? What is she still figuring out, and how does she help us respect that process?
  4. Logos (logical connections, premises, metaphors /similes, wordplay?)
  5. Pathos -- positive or negative effect on feelings of characters or reader
  6. Part to the whole - relate this particular passage to whole story of "China Men"?
  7. Relate to "The Human and Society": for ex., legal cases, citizenship, immigration, race, gender, American society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries...?

 

 

Week 10 Lab: Exam prep Essay Prep with The Laws_ chapter: We will divide the chapter into four parts. Your group will be assigned to one of the four parts. Group goal: TO DECIDE WHICH LAW in your part of the chapter IS MOST IMPORTANT IN RELATION TO A SPECIFIC OTHER PART OF _CHINA MEN_ THAT YOU NAME (WITH PAGE #) AND PRESENT TO THE CLASS. You will need to present *both* the law *and* the episode, incident, reaction, or thought process of little Maxine or the men in her family in order to do this groupwork. You *HAVE* to find somewhere else in the narrative to hang your law onto (you need a date and description for your law, and a page # for that incident or remark). Also, when you tell the class which LAW was your group’s winner, be sure to tell why the incident in little Maxine's life or the lives of her menfolk mattered in MHK’s story as a whole. For example, if you find the "Driving Out" reference in "The Laws" and the Alaska chapter, why does this entry matter to the story of Maxine's "China Men" as a whole?

1] Burlingham Treaty through California Const Convention (152 through second paragraph of 154)

2] 1880 (modification of treaty through 1893 Yue Ting v. U.S (from second par 154- bottom 155. Check the date of Yick Wo and remember that Plessy belongs somewhere… in here? though not in CM.

3] 1898 "Another victory" (bottom 155) through The Refugee Act of 1948 (bottom 157). Remember Plessy belongs somewhere… in here?

4] 1950 After the Chinese Communist government took over (bottom 157) through the end of the chapter (159).

 

ESSAY 6 final draft WILL BE DUE IN DROPBOX, SATURDAY 5 PM OF WEEK 10. Turnitin too, of course. Some of you may want to complete this before Saturday; others may take the extra day. Up to you!

Make sure you sign up for a conference if you want one! Don't leave it to the last minute...

Sample Topics Stanton:History of Women's Suffrage + Dec. of Sentiments Douglass: Narrative, 1852 Speech 13th, 14th, 15th Amendments, Reconstruction Legal Cases (Plessy, Mendez , Brown v. Bd. of Ed) Cable/ Grady Du Bois, Washington Kingston: China Men
Cultural Tradition: inherited? created? resisted?              
Cultural Change: who creates it, who resists it?              
Laws: names, dates, role? importance to specific groups or people?              
Public and private: who speaks out? who is silenced? who talks back?              
Role of race or economics?              
Role of men/ women?              

 

Finals Week:  NOTE YOUR TIME AND PLACE! The regular class is Tuesday, 4-6. The Honors class is Thursday 1:30-3:30:

Humanities 29053: Your final exam for the 3:30 class is Tuesday, March 20, 4-6 pm in HH 224. Note that this 4:00 time is later than our usual class time of 3:30. Bring two bluebooks and two pens.

Humanities Honors HB1 29095 : Your final exam for the Honors class is Thursday, March 22, 1:30-3:30 in HH 214. Note that this 1:30 time is earlier than our usual class time of 2:00. Bring two bluebooks and two pens.

EXAM FORMAT for Winter Final.

PART I. Six out of eight short answers, 3-5 sentences each from after the midterm. May include xerox of one image. 50%

PART III. Choose one out of two topics. Essay will require you to use at least two texts from after the midterm. See Sample Topics grid above. 25%.

Part II. Passage analysis. You will be given a passage to work with, and the tips below. 25%. You may use these tips as a template, or integrate them into an essay.

  1. Paraphrase the main point of the passage: what's going on here? Identify any characters or cultural figures named in the passage. Call the narrator "Kingston" and her younger self "little Maxine" or "young Maxine" or "Maxine."
  2. Identify two or three important keywords, explain or define ?
  3. Ethos of narrator: What does she know, that makes us trust her authority? What is she still figuring out, and how does she help us respect that process?
  4. Logos (connections, premises, metaphors /similes used in the passage)
  5. Pathos -- positive or negative effect on feelings of listeners or reader
  6. Part to the whole - relate this particular passage to story of "China Men"?
  7. Relate to "The Human and Society": for ex., legal cases, citizenship, immigration, race, gender, American society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries...?

 

 

 

Good luck on all your finals, and best wishes for spring quarter!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Section Policies and Procedures
Humanities Core Course

Vivian Folkenflik

Office: HIB 197 (in HCC office; enter student door near Artsbridge)
Office hours Monday 1-3 and Thursday 12-1

E-Mail: vrfolken@uci.edu

Website: http://vivian-folkenflik.org/

http://vivian-folkenflik.org/core-course-winter%2012.htm

Class website on eee, or http://vivian-folkenflik.org/core-course-winter%2012.htm

Welcome! I teach this class because I love it, and I look forward to working with each and all of you, individually and as a group. Get to know your classmates and consider them as team partners.The Humanities Core Course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the humanities for freshmen that is designed to develop reading, writing, note-taking, research, and discussion skills. Students will be expected to challenge their abilities in argumentation, interpretation, and research, and be responsible members of a smaller intellectual community, their Core section. We have an exciting new quarter ahead! Assignments and updates will be posted on my website, linked to your eee or at http://vivian-folkenflik.org

Section Policies and Procedures
Humanities Core Course

Attendance: Attendance in lecture and section is mandatory. More than two absences will affect your grade. More than three absences will be grounds for failure in the course. Excused absences will require medical documentation.  Late arrivals can be counted as absences.  To receive credit for attendance, you will also be expected to participate with appropriate comments, questions, and attentiveness.

Requirements: These are guidelines intended to help students plan their work in this course. However, the Course Director reserves the right to make changes in these evaluation criteria during the course of the quarter.

The writing grade is determined by performance on three presentations/essays (30%, 30% and 30%) and participation in several required research and writing exercises. Although the writing participation requirement numerically accounts for 10% of your writing grade, failure to participate is grounds for failure in this portion of the course. The writing participation grade will be determined by two library assignments ("Discovery Tasks"), participation in peer editing and the drafting process, your final portfolio of writing, and in-class writing activities and quizzes.

The lecture grade is determined by performance on the midterm examination (40%) and final examination (50%), and participation in several required argument and interpretation exercises. Although the lecture participation requirement numerically accounts for 10% of your lecture grade, failure to participate is grounds for failure in the course. The lecture participation grade will be determined by responses to weekly reading and discussion questions, postings to the listserv discussion or "Messageboard" and in-class discussion and debate.   Lecture attendance is also a mandatory element of the course

Of Special Note:

No late papers are accepted in this section. I am happy to help you get an early start on your written assignments. You are responsible for backing up texts composed on a computer, and failures of software or hardware are not acceptable reasons for a late assignment.

All drafts, assignments, and final essays written outside of class must be typed and in proper format. Final drafts are to be turned in with previous drafts and peer editing comments. Save all work. You will be expected to turn in a complete writing portfolio at the end of the quarter.

This section of the Humanities Core Course may also require electronic submission of your written work.  If so, you will be expected to sign a release that clarifies your rights and obligations in this process.

Standard Written English:

In keeping with the Standard Written English policy of this course, you will be expected to correct errors in mechanics, usage, grammar, and spelling -- even on final drafts. Corrections on final drafts will be an essential part of your portfolio grade.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious matter and will be handled by the appropriate authorities. Supervisors and instructors in this course regularly review suspect papers. Turning in any work which is not your own and not properly acknowledged as such will result in a recommendation for failure in the course and subject you to further action by the university. Please review the university policy on academic dishonesty and speak to me if you have questions.

Internet sources must also be properly acknowledged.  For more information about how to cite Internet sources, check the Mayfield electronic resources guide or the EasyWriter Handbook. Internet Information: Please review the Internet use policies for the Humanities Core Course in the Guide.  This quarter it will also be important to be familiar with the "References" section of the main web page (http://eee.uci.edu/programs/humcore/Student)  In addition, as part of a program-wide effort to discourage plagiarism, you also may be asked to turn in electronic copy of your essay to http://www.TurnItIn.com (as a pasted file).

E-mail queries to your instructor should assume delays in transmission and the observance of normal university business days by instructors and staff in the course.  Always allow time for delayed replies.